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International Geo-Politics

Japan-India Nuclear Cooperation

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Writer: Takako Hirose and Takeshi Yokoo
Civil nuclear cooperation is an important element of Japan-India cooperation and is expected to play a significant role for the prosperity of our two nations.  The world trend is to continue the use of civil nuclear power, while recognising its risks and trying to reduce them. Japan concluded bilateral agreements with UK, Canada, USA, France and Australia in the 1950s-1970s and agreements were concluded with China and Euratom in 1986 and 2006 respectively. Agreements with Kazakhstan, Republic of Korea, Vietnam, Jordan and Russia were signed before March 2011 and came into effect in 2011 and 2012. Negotiations with India, Turkey, South Africa and other nations started before March 2011, but were deferred mainly because of the inconclusive debates on Japan’s own energy policy.

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Assessing the Strategic Importance of Vietnam: Current Security Dynamics for Japan and India

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Writer: Dr Satoru Nagao
In 1990, US Navy possessed 230 “big surface combatants” while China possessed only 16. By 2013, however, US possession has come down to 101 while that of China has increased to 40 “big surface combatants”. This has been fuelling Chinese assertiveness.  In response Vietnam ordered six new submarines in 2009. Likewise, Malaysia got two submarines in 2009. Singapore, also, increased their submarines from four to five. Indonesia plans to increase submarines from two to twelve. Similarly, Philippines’ and Thailand’s plan to acquire their first submarine are under consideration.

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India-Japan-Vietnam Relationship

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Writer: Capt Bonji Ohara (retd)
A former Japanese Captain of The MSDF writes perceptively on the issue of bilateral and multilateral cooperation to address the threat to our commerce on the high seas. Chinese Navy went into Spratly Islands in 1988 and then engaged in an artillery battle with the Vietnamese Navy sinking two Vietnamese Ships and killed 80 Vietnamese soldiers. China prefers to use Bilateral Talks rather than Multilateral Talks to discuss the dispute in South China Sea.  But, the denial of Multilateral Security Cooperation will make China isolated in International Society. Ad hoc Multilateral Security Cooperation based on these kinds of Bilateral Security Frameworks can be one of the solutions to Maritime Security.

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India Adopts a New Assertive Geostrategy for the Twenty-First Century

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Writer: Vassilios Damiras Ph.D. (ABD)

Following India’s independence in 1947, then Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru inaugurated a foreign and defense policy that was based on principles of socialism and remaining uncommitted to the Cold War disputes. Eventually, this specific policy led to India becoming the founding and leading member state of the Non Aligned Movement in 1955. This approach was described by various diplomats and scholars as noncommittal, neutral, and immoral. It placed India to collaborate in bilateral global commitments only in crisis that were neutral.

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China as a Global Naval Power

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Writer: Vassilios Damiras Ph.D. (ABD)

Since 1990s, the Peoples’ Liberation Army (PLA) Navy has increasingly transformed from a large fleet of low-capability, single-mission naval platforms, to a much leaner force equipped with a more modern, multi-mission platforms. Compare to the fleet a decade ago, a variety of PLA Navy combatants and vessels are equipped with highly advanced airdefence systems and very sophisticated Anti-Ship Cruise Missiles-ASCMS, with ranges in excess to 297 miles. These brand new highlysophisticated systems and modernised military platforms give a great capacity to urge an anti-surface warfare (ASuW) and also allow them to execute complex military operations far beyond the range of land-based air defences.

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