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Tuesday October 15, 2019

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International Experts' Opinion on world's defence and security

Al-Qaeda and the Arab Spring: The End of an Era or the Emergence of a New Threat?

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Writer: Ilias Papadopoulos
The immediate objective of the Al-Qaeda was to drive all non-muslim forces from the areas that comprised the 7th century Caliphate, unify these lands and eventually re-establish that political entity and run it by the Islamic law (Sharia). The political forces opposing these goals were a series of dictatorships that were of a secular nature (Egypt, Syria, Iraq etc). These regimes became the prime target of Al-Qaeda as they constituted the barrier between the organisation and its objective. Even in the countries that toppled the established regimes by largely peaceful means, the following elections brought to power Islamic parties. This is a clear indication that although Al-Qaeda was not the driving force behind the Arab Spring, the dynamic behind it was indeed Islamic. Al-Qaeda in its part was quick to adapt its narrative to the shifting realities. The organisation claimed that the Arab Spring was possible due to them, since it was the group that had educated the Arabs to rise and oust the dictatorships. A thought- provoking view of the Arab Spring.

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Transformational and progressive roles in policing

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Writer: Dr Rupali Jeswal

“Mindset: Continuous learning through innovation in practice and professionalism to achieve national coherence.”

“Simply put policing is a verb, meaning action – the quality and effectiveness of this action depends on wealth of knowledge, training and synchronisation within the various departments.”


Police departments need to develop into a learning organisation to be ahead, no longer can the departments rely on methods of the past to just recruit, train and conduct occasional specialised courses.  Learning organisations indulge in constant, regular empowerment and enhancement trainings along with refreshers, table-top planning exercises for rapid response (these are being conducted in western countries to improve the ability of local jurisdictions to prepare, protect and respond), on-the-job trainings and mentoring programmes so the senior level can lead the new officers and set leadership by example – efforts through this system bring a culture of dispersed leadership.

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Predicting the Unpredictable: The ICT Counterterrorism Summit

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Writer: Jessica Snapper

Although there are several versions of the story, the famous Middle East parable about the frog and the scorpion goes something like this: a frog and a scorpion want to cross a river, but the scorpion cannot swim. He asks the frog to carry him on his back, to which the frog responds, “How can I trust that you won’t sting me?”
The scorpion promises he will not attack the frog and they sign a treaty. The frog then carries the scorpion to the other side of the river. Once the scorpion finds himself on safe ground again, he immediately turns around and delivers a fatal sting to the frog. As the frog lays on the ground dying, he gasps, “How could you do something so dishonest? You promised you wouldn’t attack me!”

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Cyberwarfare Under Investigation: Flame, Stuxnet, and Strategic Alliances

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Wirter: Jessica Snapper

Considered the newest domain in modern warfare, cyberspace has now joined the ranks of traditional areas assessed by militaries all over the world. And this is exactly how cyberspace should be assessed, since an effective terrorist attack against a nation’s power grid, for example, could result in massive loss of life, crippling damage to infrastructure and a blow to the economy that could take years to repair. Stuxnet has carried out what in the past could only be accomplished by directly bombing a country’s infrastructure or sending in human agents to plant explosives.

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Japan-India Nuclear Cooperation

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Writer: Takako Hirose and Takeshi Yokoo
Civil nuclear cooperation is an important element of Japan-India cooperation and is expected to play a significant role for the prosperity of our two nations.  The world trend is to continue the use of civil nuclear power, while recognising its risks and trying to reduce them. Japan concluded bilateral agreements with UK, Canada, USA, France and Australia in the 1950s-1970s and agreements were concluded with China and Euratom in 1986 and 2006 respectively. Agreements with Kazakhstan, Republic of Korea, Vietnam, Jordan and Russia were signed before March 2011 and came into effect in 2011 and 2012. Negotiations with India, Turkey, South Africa and other nations started before March 2011, but were deferred mainly because of the inconclusive debates on Japan’s own energy policy.

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Thermal imaging for constant vigilance

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Writer: Mr Peter Banham

The writer, takes a look at the potential impact of a new generation of lower cost, high performance, thermal imaging cameras and how these can make a difference in security and surveillance in the Indian context.


The key advantage for thermal imaging systems is range – providing true and accurate remote monitoring.  In the security sector, range equates against time: time to react, time to adjust, time to respond. Thermal security cameras detect the minute differences in heat that are all around us, all the time. This heat energy is easier to detect over longer ranges than visible light, giving thermal cameras their advantage


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Assessing the Strategic Importance of Vietnam: Current Security Dynamics for Japan and India

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Writer: Dr Satoru Nagao
In 1990, US Navy possessed 230 “big surface combatants” while China possessed only 16. By 2013, however, US possession has come down to 101 while that of China has increased to 40 “big surface combatants”. This has been fuelling Chinese assertiveness.  In response Vietnam ordered six new submarines in 2009. Likewise, Malaysia got two submarines in 2009. Singapore, also, increased their submarines from four to five. Indonesia plans to increase submarines from two to twelve. Similarly, Philippines’ and Thailand’s plan to acquire their first submarine are under consideration.

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Crash Proof Barriers Against Vehicle Based Attacks

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Writer: Paul Jeffrey

The writer considers the growing need for physical protection and looks at the range of options available. Physical protection may include rising arm barriers, road blockers, sliding armoured gates plus bollards and fencing.  Often a combination of product types may be used, especially on larger sites. To stop potential Vehicle based IED attacks such barriers must be crash tested. Robust physical security measures also send out a very visual signal that can assist in deterring terrorists or indeed anyone else interested in gaining non-authorised access.

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India-Japan-Vietnam Relationship

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Writer: Capt Bonji Ohara (retd)
A former Japanese Captain of The MSDF writes perceptively on the issue of bilateral and multilateral cooperation to address the threat to our commerce on the high seas. Chinese Navy went into Spratly Islands in 1988 and then engaged in an artillery battle with the Vietnamese Navy sinking two Vietnamese Ships and killed 80 Vietnamese soldiers. China prefers to use Bilateral Talks rather than Multilateral Talks to discuss the dispute in South China Sea.  But, the denial of Multilateral Security Cooperation will make China isolated in International Society. Ad hoc Multilateral Security Cooperation based on these kinds of Bilateral Security Frameworks can be one of the solutions to Maritime Security.

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India: Terror Outfits and Jihad

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Writer: Dr Rupali Jeswal

The transnational links amongst various militant groups and criminal organisations due to geographic overlap of operations requires a great deal of understanding on transnational links between terrorist outfits and criminal organisations. The environment for these overlaps and points of opportunities are Prisons, Cyberspace, Social Network sites, territories and regions with no governance and more corruption, border regions (IDP – Internally Displaced People – also causes a concern), conflict or post-conflict zones, overcrowded mega cities and poverty, last but not the least – hostile governments who sponsor and support terrorist activities to use this MO as a strategic tool for political agenda.

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India Adopts a New Assertive Geostrategy for the Twenty-First Century

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Writer: Vassilios Damiras Ph.D. (ABD)

Following India’s independence in 1947, then Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru inaugurated a foreign and defense policy that was based on principles of socialism and remaining uncommitted to the Cold War disputes. Eventually, this specific policy led to India becoming the founding and leading member state of the Non Aligned Movement in 1955. This approach was described by various diplomats and scholars as noncommittal, neutral, and immoral. It placed India to collaborate in bilateral global commitments only in crisis that were neutral.

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